Curt Thompson on How our Attachment History Impacts our Relationship with God, Part Two

March 19, 2019

Welcome to Attachment Theory in Action! Our podcast is dedicated to therapists, social workers, counselors and psychologists who are working with clients from an attachment-based perspective. Interviews are conducted with individuals who are doing clinical work as well as leading attachment theory researchers.

Your host, Karen Doyle Buckwalter will introduce you to Curt Thompson, M.D., who will discuss how our attachment history impacts our relationship with God. 

Curt Thompson, M.D., is a psychiatrist in private practice in Falls Church, Virginia and the founder of Being Known, LLC, and The Center for Being Known, an organization that develops resources to educate and train leaders about the intersection between interpersonal neurobiology, Christian spiritual formation, and vocational creativity. He is the author of Anatomy of the Souland The Soul of Shame: Retelling the Stories We Believe About Ourselves. He graduated from Wright State University School of Medicine, completed his psychiatric residency at Temple University Hospital, and is board certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. He is actively engaged in learning and education as he supervises clinical employees and facilitates ongoing education groups for patients and colleagues. Throughout his career, along with treating adults, adolescents, and families, his main focus of clinical and research interest has been the integration of psychiatry, its associated disciplines, and Christian spirituality. He is a frequent speaker on the topic at workshops, conferences, and retreats.    

He has specific expertise in the field of interpersonal neurobiology and how it reflects important tenants of Christian faith, providing opportunities to comprehend and experience that same faith in fresh trustworthy ways. Much of his work is now committed to training other professionals across cultures and in multiple vocational domains in the same material.

He and his wife Phyllis are the parents of two children and reside in Arlington, Virginia. He serves as an elder at Washington Community Fellowship, a congregation of the Mennonite church, in Washington, D.C. His duties there have included preaching, teaching, and involvement in the fellowship’s healing prayer ministry.

Curt Thompson on How our Attachment History Impacts our Relationship with God, Part One

March 12, 2019

Welcome to Attachment Theory in Action! Our podcast is dedicated to therapists, social workers, counselors and psychologists who are working with clients from an attachment-based perspective. Interviews are conducted with individuals who are doing clinical work as well as leading attachment theory researchers.

Your host, Karen Doyle Buckwalter will introduce you to Curt Thompson, M.D., who will discuss how our attachment history impacts our relationship with God. 

Curt Thompson, M.D., is a psychiatrist in private practice in Falls Church, Virginia and the founder of Being Known, LLC, and The Center for Being Known, an organization that develops resources to educate and train leaders about the intersection between interpersonal neurobiology, Christian spiritual formation, and vocational creativity. He is the author of Anatomy of the Soul and The Soul of Shame: Retelling the Stories We Believe About Ourselves. He graduated from Wright State University School of Medicine, completed his psychiatric residency at Temple University Hospital, and is board certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. He is actively engaged in learning and education as he supervises clinical employees and facilitates ongoing education groups for patients and colleagues. Throughout his career, along with treating adults, adolescents, and families, his main focus of clinical and research interest has been the integration of psychiatry, its associated disciplines, and Christian spirituality. He is a frequent speaker on the topic at workshops, conferences, and retreats.    

He has specific expertise in the field of interpersonal neurobiology and how it reflects important tenants of Christian faith, providing opportunities to comprehend and experience that same faith in fresh trustworthy ways. Much of his work is now committed to training other professionals across cultures and in multiple vocational domains in the same material.

He and his wife Phyllis are the parents of two children and reside in Arlington, Virginia. He serves as an elder at Washington Community Fellowship, a congregation of the Mennonite church, in Washington, D.C. His duties there have included preaching, teaching, and involvement in the fellowship’s healing prayer ministry.

Bonnie Badenoch on the Myth of Self-Regulation, Part Two

March 5, 2019

Welcome to Attachment Theory in Action! Our podcast is dedicated to therapists, social workers, counselors and psychologists who are working with clients from an attachment-based perspective. Interviews are conducted with individuals who are doing clinical work as well as leading attachment theory researchers.

Your host, Karen Doyle Buckwalter will introduce you to Bonnie Badenoch, who will explore the myth of self-regulation. This week's episode is the first in a two-part series with Ms Badenoch, so be sure to tune in next week for part two!

Bonnie Badenoch, LMFT, therapist, mentor, teacher, and author, has spent the last 15 years integrating the discoveries of relational neuroscience into the art of therapy. In 2008, she co-founded the nonprofit agency Nurturing the Heart with the Brain in Mind to offer this work to the community of therapists, healthcare providers, and others interested in becoming therapeutic presences in the world. For 25 years, she has supported trauma survivors and those with significant attachment wounds to reshape their neural landscapes for a life of meaning, resilience, and warm relationships. These days, Bonnie takes joy in offering immersion trainings for therapists and others. These year-long groups cultivate the capacity for presence through the development of deep listening and the embodiment of the principles of interpersonal neurobiology. Her conviction that wisdom about the relational brain can support healing experiences for people at every age led to the publication of Being a Brain-Wise Therapist: A Practical Guide to Interpersonal Neurobiology in 2008 and The Brain-Savvy Therapist’s Workbook in 2011. Bonnie’s latest writing is The Heart of Trauma: Healing the Embodied Brain in the Context of Relationships (2017)These books seek to build a bridge between science and practice with clarity, compassion, and heart.

Bonnie Badenoch on the Myth of Self-Regulation, Part One

February 26, 2019

Welcome to Attachment Theory in Action! Our podcast is dedicated to therapists, social workers, counselors and psychologists who are working with clients from an attachment-based perspective. Interviews are conducted with individuals who are doing clinical work as well as leading attachment theory researchers.

Your host, Karen Doyle Buckwalter will introduce you to Bonnie Badenoch, who will explore the myth of self-regulation. This week's episode is the first in a two-part series with Ms Badenoch, so be sure to tune in next week for part two!

Bonnie Badenoch, LMFT, therapist, mentor, teacher, and author, has spent the last 15 years integrating the discoveries of relational neuroscience into the art of therapy. In 2008, she co-founded the nonprofit agency Nurturing the Heart with the Brain in Mind to offer this work to the community of therapists, healthcare providers, and others interested in becoming therapeutic presences in the world. For 25 years, she has supported trauma survivors and those with significant attachment wounds to reshape their neural landscapes for a life of meaning, resilience, and warm relationships. These days, Bonnie takes joy in offering immersion trainings for therapists and others. These year-long groups cultivate the capacity for presence through the development of deep listening and the embodiment of the principles of interpersonal neurobiology. Her conviction that wisdom about the relational brain can support healing experiences for people at every age led to the publication of Being a Brain-Wise Therapist: A Practical Guide to Interpersonal Neurobiology in 2008 and The Brain-Savvy Therapist’s Workbook in 2011. Bonnie’s latest writing is The Heart of Trauma: Healing the Embodied Brain in the Context of Relationships (2017)These books seek to build a bridge between science and practice with clarity, compassion, and heart.

Rebecca Shahmoon-Shanok on Reflective Supervision and Attachment-Based Therapy

February 19, 2019

Welcome to Attachment Theory in Action! Our podcast is dedicated to therapists, social workers, counselors and psychologists who are working with clients from an attachment-based perspective. Interviews are conducted with individuals who are doing clinical work as well as leading attachment theory researchers.

Your host, Karen Doyle Buckwalter will introduce you to Rebecca Shahmoon-Shanok, who will discuss reflective supervision and attachment-based therapy.

Rebecca Shahmoon-Shanok, LCSW, PhD, is a clinician, teacher and author in the pregnancy and parenting through preschool fields; is among the developers of reflective supervision; of integrating mindfulness into the fields of early childhood mental health and care; of interweaving mental health services in community-based settings; and of training professionals across disciplines together since 1980. With degrees and experience as clinical psychologist, social worker and early childhood educator, and extensive experience in psychoanalysis, infant mental health, mindfulness, and in developmentally and/or traumatically challenged young children and their parents, Dr. Shahmoon-Shanok developed a model that integrates mental health consultation plus a range of successful mental health services within childcare and Head Start utilizing peer play psychotherapy for a variety of children with serious challenges. She is a CPP Trainer. After participating in Undoing Racism Workshops over a dozen years, she has participated in the Harris Foundation’s Tenets Workgroup since 2012. Founding CEO/Academic Director of Collaborations for Growth and Senior Research Associate for Relationships for Growth & Learning, Center for Attachment Research, New School for Social Research, she served as board member of Zero to Three for thirty-six years and is the founder of the New York Zero-to-Three Network, continuing on its board. Dr. Shahmoon-Shanok currently gives workshops and short courses on reflective supervision, and co-chairs the Reflective Supervision Collaborative which is becoming the first long-term training for reflective supervisors and trainers across the country and an online clearing house of RS materials.

Rebecca S. Molitor on Facilitating Prenatal Bonding

February 12, 2019

Welcome to Attachment Theory in Action! Our podcast is dedicated to therapists, social workers, counselors and psychologists who are working with clients from an attachment-based perspective. Interviews are conducted with individuals who are doing clinical work as well as leading attachment theory researchers.

Your host, Karen Doyle Buckwalter will introduce you to Rebecca S. Molitor, who will explore how to facilitate prenatal bonding. 

Rebecca Molitor considers herself fortunate to do every day what she is most passionate about...partnering with individuals and families to connect and reconnect with each other and themselves through gaining understanding, acceptance and creating changes in a compassionate manner. After working as a therapist in child social services for over a decade, Rebecca branched into private practice specializing in work with children from birth into adulthood, with an emphasis on attachment, trauma, mindfulness and self-acceptance. She has been involved in Illinois Early Intervention since 2000 as a Developmental Therapist, Psychological Service Provider and Evaluator, and currently as the Social Emotional Consultant for CFC 21 and 22. Rebecca has presented on a variety of topics related to prenatal attachment, development, children, working with families, and provider self-nurturance throughout Illinois to schools, community groups and agencies, home visiting programs and conferences. Most recently, Rebecca has ventured into the prenatal world, becoming one of the first certified Prenatal Bonding (BA) Facilitators and trainer-in-training for the United States.

George Downing on the Use of Video Intervention Therapy to Strengthen Mentalization

February 5, 2019

Welcome to Attachment Theory in Action! Our podcast is dedicated to therapists, social workers, counselors and psychologists who are working with clients from an attachment-based perspective. Interviews are conducted with individuals who are doing clinical work as well as leading attachment theory researchers.

Your host, Karen Doyle Buckwalter will introduce you to George Downing, who will discuss how the use of Video Intervention Therapy can strengthen mentalization.

George Downing, Ph. D., an American psychologist, lives in Paris where he is on the teaching faculties of Salpétrière Hospital and Paris University VIII. He also teaches clinical seminars at the universities of Munich, Heidelberg, Padua, and the New School for Social Research, New York.

He is the author of numerous articles on video intervention, on child development research, and on other aspects of psychotherapy.

For more information on George Downing and Video Intervention Therapy, visit http://www.vit-downing.com/ 

Deborah Gray on How Grief and Loss Impact Attachment

January 29, 2019

Welcome to Attachment Theory in Action! Our podcast is dedicated to therapists, social workers, counselors and psychologists who are working with clients from an attachment-based perspective. Interviews are conducted with individuals who are doing clinical work as well as leading attachment theory researchers.

Your host, Karen Doyle Buckwalter will introduce you to Deborah Gray, who will discuss how grief and loss impact attachment. 

As a bonus for our listeners, Deborah has made available a downloadable handout to supplement this week's episode. Be sure to check it out at the link below!

https://www.theknowledgecenteratchaddock.com/grief-and-loss

Deborah Gray, MPA, LICSW specializes in the attachment, grief, and trauma issues of children in her practice, Nurturing Attachments. Her passion is to help families develop close, satisfying relationships

In 2015 Deborah received a lifetime achievement award from the International ATTACh organization for her contributions to the attachment field. Deborah is core faculty for the Attachment/Trauma-Focused Therapy Program and Portland State University Foster and Adoption Therapy Program. She was the Henry Meier Practitioner in Residence at the University of WA School of Social Work.

Deborah Gray is a popular presenter due to her practical and positive approaches. She continues to work in a clinical practice with parents and children, who help to teach her new approaches and techniques every day. 

Deborah is the author of the books: Promoting Healthy Attachments: Hands-on Techniques to Use with Your Clients, Attaching in Adoption: Practical Tools for Today’s Parents, Nurturing Adoptions: Creating Resilience after Neglect and Trauma, Attaching with Love, Hugs, and Joy, and co-author of Games and Activities for Attaching with Your Child.  

Deborah provides additional information at Nurturingattachments.com

Susan Hart on Attunement and Brain Development: Why Attachment Matters, Part Two

January 22, 2019

Welcome to Attachment Theory in Action! Our podcast is dedicated to therapists, social workers, counselors and psychologists who are working with clients from an attachment-based perspective. Interviews are conducted with individuals who are doing clinical work as well as leading attachment theory researchers.

Your host, Karen Doyle Buckwalter will introduce you to Dr. Susan Hart, who will discuss the role of attachment in attunement and brain development. This is the second of a two-part interview with Dr. Hart, so be sure to check out last week's episode if you missed out on part one! 

Susan Hart, Ph.D. is a psychologist, specialist and supervisor in psychotherapy and child psychology. With a background in child psychiatry, family and adult therapy, Susan is now self-employed. She is the originator of the neuroaffective development theory, which is based on modern brain research, and which she began to develop about 20 years ago by connecting neuroscience with developmental psychology. Her overriding goal is to develop assessment methods aimed at providing the right intervention method for individual child or family by identifying and mapping their zone of proximal development. She is currently developing ways to translate the neuroaffective concept into practice through her extensive lecture and workshop activity, publications, manuals and the present doctoral dissertation, which is based on research into newly developed assessment methods within the neuroaffective framework. She is the author, co-author and editor of 14 books on trauma, dissociation and neuroaffective developmental psychology and psychotherapy. Four of her books have been translated and published in English. Together with colleagues she has also developed two developmental programmes, one for children’s groups and one for parent’s groups.

Susan Hart on Attunement and Brain Development: Why Attachment Matters, Part One

January 15, 2019

Welcome to Attachment Theory in Action! Our podcast is dedicated to therapists, social workers, counselors and psychologists who are working with clients from an attachment-based perspective. Interviews are conducted with individuals who are doing clinical work as well as leading attachment theory researchers.

Your host, Karen Doyle Buckwalter will introduce you to Dr. Susan Hart, who will discuss the role of attachment in attunement and brain development. 

Susan Hart, Ph.D. is a psychologist, specialist and supervisor in psychotherapy and child psychology. With a background in child psychiatry, family and adult therapy, Susan is now self-employed. She is the originator of the neuroaffective development theory, which is based on modern brain research, and which she began to develop about 20 years ago by connecting neuroscience with developmental psychology. Her overriding goal is to develop assessment methods aimed at providing the right intervention method for individual child or family by identifying and mapping their zone of proximal development. She is currently developing ways to translate the neuroaffective concept into practice through her extensive lecture and workshop activity, publications, manuals and the present doctoral dissertation, which is based on research into newly developed assessment methods within the neuroaffective framework. She is the author, co-author and editor of 14 books on trauma, dissociation and neuroaffective developmental psychology and psychotherapy. Four of her books have been translated and published in English. Together with colleagues she has also developed two developmental programmes, one for children’s groups and one for parent’s groups.